Buttered Yam Wardrobe Reveal

Hopefully, you’ve been following the progression of this wonderful piece all week! If you haven’t, you can’t always go back and watch part one, two and three of the Veneer Repair Series.  The wardrobe made it’s way to the shop in really bad shape. Top to bottom, it was covered in veneer damage!

 

How to repair damaged veneer

How to repair damaged veneer

How to repair damaged veneer

How to repair damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

Nothing a little bondo couldn’t take care of though!

Repairing damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

Repairing damaged veneer

After sanding all that bondo down, I painted this beast with Benjamin Moore’s Buttered Yam and Websters Chalk Paint Powder. I brought out the character and highlighted some of the damaged veneer {left on purpose} with a little wet distressing. I also used my Ink Distressing Technique for added depth and shadowing. It came out just as I envisioned it and I can’t wait for my client to put her hands on it!

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

Orange Wardrobe by A to Z Custom Creations

This is the side I showed in the video tutorial! See how smooth Bondo sands? No inconsistency in the paint either!

Convinced? I hope you gained a little confidence with this series! I sure enjoyed having you “in” the shop with me this week! See ya for the next transformation! 

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Comments

  1. Beautiful transformation. Thank you so much for the time and effort that went into this post, actually the entire series. I learned so much I didn’t know. You’re a great teacher, Sugar!

  2. Loved this tutorial and the final product is beautiful!! I have been trying to find something to use on damaged furniture instead of wood filler. I went & got some Bondo today!!

  3. Hi Angela- I just love your videos! I just found you today on Pinterest, and I’ll definitely be following your work! A couple questions: Why did you add chalk paint powder to your Benjamin Moore paint instead of using just the paint? And also, about how much would a finished product like that armoire sell for in your shop?
    thanks so much,
    Laurie

    • Hi Laurie! Thank you for your kind words! I’m so glad you found your way to the blog and I hope you enjoy the videos to come! I use Chalk Paint Powder for several reasons. First, it eliminates the need to sand and prime the surface prior to painting. Second, it provides a nice, chalky texture that distresses well, especially with water :) As for pricing, that varies greatly. A painted wardrobe of this size would normally sell for $500-$800. I’m in Arkansas though and the market varies greatly from state to state. My painting friends to the south could probably get twice that ;) All the best!

  4. Beautiful!!! Still trying to get used to the orangishniness of it. I am trying this year to get out of my comfort zone with the creams/whites…so ..who knows!! Might try a shade of this!! Well done!! I have an ornate table I got for free from an estate sale I need to fix. It is laminate on the top and it is cracked and broken. Never thought of using Bondo…wonder if I could use it to ‘fill in’ the pieces that are missing from the top!?!! Thanks for showing this…you did an awesome job!!

    • Oh, Pam! You gotta have something orange in your house! Just one thing! ;) Orange really can be a neutral! It’s lively, brings a pop of color and happiness to any space! The beauty of orange is that it plays well with every other color! I’m tellin’ you…you’ll love it if you try it! Come back and tell me all about it when you do! As for the filling of your top, yes, bondo would be perfect! I’m glad you enjoyed the series and I hope you are able to use what your learned! All the best, Angela {lover of all things orange} lol!

  5. Christine says:

    I agree. :) Orange looks gorgeous with white and cream! and orange comes in all shades, from peaches to ORANGE!

    I love what you did with this piece. I think this one has convinced me to pick up some Webster’s. I have so many colors I absolutely love, but don’t want to fuss them up with inaccurate plaster, grout or joint compound.

    And last but not least, this is a fabulous piece. The configuration of the cabinet is so attractive and rustic to me. Really great job once again.

    • Thank you Christine! I’d love to hear what you think about Websters and would love even more to SEE what you do with it! It’s pretty darn awesome! I’ve tried every home-made recipe out there and Websters makes it simple and perfect every time! Thanks for your kind words! I look forward to hearing more from ya!

  6. Hi Angela. I noticed that there were some areas of veneer chipping left un-fixed. I was wondering if it’s because of where the damage is located on the piece….rather…are there certain spots that are difficult to repair? Or did you simply leave it to keep some of the character?
    Also, I have made my own chalk paint, bought name brand chalk paint, made my own milk paint and of course have used acrylics and latex. But I have never thought of adding some of my chalk paint to another paint? Do you add them in equal parts? Is the finished product (paint) just like chalk paint but a little less chalky? (Distress easily but maybe not as chalky as it would if only using chalk paint?) Lots of questions I know. lol. Just wondering what the benefits are to adding chalk paint to a latex instead of simply using the chalk paint…or the latex. Well…I know the benefits of using the chalk instead of latex…but I’m not sure what the benefit is of using “part chalk part latex” over “just chalk”? haha hope I said that right!
    Anyways…LOVE this piece! Love the tutorial!!! Thank you SO much for sharing it all!!

    • Hi Kendra! Great questions! I always welcome them as they really add to the post! Yes, I left some of the damaged veneer because I wanted to keep some of that character! This piece has been in my client’s family for generations so we wanted it to still tell that story! Any time I can highlight damage and use it for beauty, I do! As for the paint additive I use, it’s Websters Chalk Paint Powder and unlike the homemade recipes, it takes the guess work out of mixing! When mixed with flat or matte latex paint, it distresses just like pre-mixed chalk style paint. The benefit of adding it to latex is that it gives the latex the chalky feel and makes it adhere to just about anything without the need for stripping and in most cases, sanding. Honestly though, even with pre-mixed chalk style paints, I still scuff the kind of surfaces I scuff with Websters. I’m old school and that’s okay, RIGHT? I’m a total color lover and just love the endless color options I have when I use Websters but I’m also a paint floozy and I’ll use whatever works for my project! I paint because I love it! I hope that helps! Thanks again for adding to the post! ~ Angela~

  7. What a great post! Love the finished look. You work magic with your repair work and I love the way you leave some of the damaged veneer for character. Thank you for such a detailed tutorial, your info is so usable because of all the trouble you go to, to make sure we can absorb and use it without any real problems. Thank you for your detailed post.

    • Thank you Carolyn! I am so glad you enjoyed the post! It really means a lot to me to hear that you are benefiting from them! It makes it so much more fun for me! All the best!!

  8. I have a family heirloom of sorts that has water damage on the veneer. It’s chipping off like crazy and Mom finally gave the go-ahead to fix it. I’m a total newbie and need to figure out how to do this right. I loved the tutorial(s). But I have a few questions. Because of the water damage, can I remove the veneer completely on the top and cover it with Bondo? Is that even possible? And then another question or ten…. lol. Can you explain to me what chalk paint is and it’s purpose? Do I understand that the spray paint will be the color that is revealed through the distressing? Is there any prep work for undamaged areas of veneer before you begin painting? So many questions…. And cute accent. My hubby’s got one and it won me over!

    • Hi Chelsea! Thank you for your kind words and your questions! They add to the conversation and help this community of DIY’ers thrive! First off. You need to figure out what is under the layer of veneer. Go to the back of the piece and take a look. You’ll see the layers, veneer on top then the substrate. Chances are, it will have a solid wood substrate. It may not be high quality but as long as it’s wood {not particle board} you can work with it. In fact, many times if it’s solid and the damage is too bad, I’ll remove all the veneer and just stain or paint the substrate. You won’t need to use Bondo in that case.

      Chalk style paint provides a matte finish and in most cases, eliminates the need for sanding and priming a piece first.

      You are correct about the spray paint. You will see that color come thru.

      Prep work should always include a thorough cleaning. I use T.S.P to lift unseen dirt and oil. If you choose a chalk style paint nothing else will be necessary!

      Be fearless, have fun and share your pics with me! All the best!

Trackbacks

  1. […] it is, the last video in the series. I’ll post the reFreshed wardrobe tomorrow so, stick around for all the closeup […]

  2. […] distressing with spray paint. You may remember me using this method after repairing the veneer on this piece. Two light coats of Rustoleum 2X Coverage, in the shade of your choice, will make for […]

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